From Chanel Benoit, Account Director at Greenough Brand Storytellers

Facebook takes aim at preventative care 

Facebook is making a targeted push into healthcare with the launch of a new tool that encourages users to use the platform to stay on top of routine health tasks such as getting flu shots and cancer screenings.

Following public controversy around its privacy practices, Facebook’s success will depend on its ability to regain the trust of consumers, no easy task with information as personal as one’s health history. 

Get the full story at STAT

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Alphabet buys FitBit

Earlier this month, Alphabet, Google’s parent, announced its intention to buy FitBit, valuing the smartwatch maker at more than $2 billion. CNBC reported that the acquisition pits Alphabet against fellow tech giant Apple in the wearable fitness tracking arena.

Fitbit’s stock surged more than 30% following the announcement – good news considering the company has been losing ground to Apple’s smartwatch for some time.

Learn more about the deal in CNBC

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Provider orgs most likely target for data breaches

Experts predict that data breaches in healthcare will cost the industry as much as $4 billion by the end of 2019, with no signs of slowing down in 2020.

According to Black Book’s annual report on data security, provider organizations such as hospitals and physician practices are the most likely targets. In fact, so far in 2019, providers have the been victims of nearly four out of five breaches.

The takeaway: Providers need to invest much more aggressively in protecting their information assets. While hospital systems are making modest increases in investments (about six percent in 2019), a whopping 92% of physician organizations still lack full-time security staff.

Get all the info in Health Data Management

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WSJ reports on “Project Nightingale,” sparking privacy concerns

More health news out of Google this month! The Wall Street Journal reported that the company is engaged with one of the nation’s largest health care systems, Ascension, with a mission to collect the personal health information of millions of people across more than 20 states.

Reportedly, the project launched in secret in 2018. The data involved includes lab results, doctor diagnoses and hospitalization records, amounting to a near-complete health history, including patient names and dates of birth.

Patients and doctors alike are understandably uneasy, but the companies insist the project follows federal health law and includes robust protections for patient data.

Read the full story at WSJ