From Christine Williamson, Vice President at Greenough Brand Storytellers

A New Way of Paying for Maternity Care

Doctors and insurers see bundled payments, or episodes of care, as a possible way to improve health outcomes and lower costs of maternity care, including driving down the number of unnecessary c-sections nationwide. But, as reporter Carmen Heredia Rodriguez points out, payment models like this are relatively new and their structure can differ by insurer. For models like this to succeed, supporters will need to show consistency, capture quality patient data and increase payer/provider collaboration.

For more information, check out NPR.org

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Hospitals Enter the Housing Business

Homelessness is one of the biggest social determinants of health, and now hospitals from Baltimore to St. Louis to Sacramento are taking action. According to Kaiser Health News, “With recent federal policy changes that encourage hospitals to allocate charity dollars for housing, many hospitals realize it’s cheaper to provide a month of housing than to keep patients for a single night.”

In addition to exploring innovative new programs like providing housing, more work must be done. This includes putting screening systems in place so that clinicians can ask important questions about food insecurity, housing instability, utility needs, transportation and interpersonal violence.

Dive deeper with Kaiser Health News

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Cartoons Help this Pediatrician Reach Young Patients

As seen in the Boston Globe: “Dr. John Maypole, a pediatrician at Boston Medical Center, creates whimsical drawings while caring for some of the most vulnerable children. He gets down on the floor and crawls under tables, if that’s what it takes — with pen and paper in hand — to distract and soothe scared youngsters.”

An amazing article from reporter Kay Lazar that shows the human side of healthcare and people who are making a difference! Exactly the type of story we like to tell at Greenough.

Get the full story at The Boston Globe

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Mass. Hospitals Face Strict Surgery Regulations

New regulations, which medical experts describe as among the most far-reaching in the country, require that doctors provide more information to patients who are considering surgery and document each time a lead surgeon enters and leaves the operating room. The regulations also take a hard line on doctors who come to work impaired by alcohol or drugs and who delegate duties to unlicensed practitioners.

Read story in The Boston Globe to learn more about what’s at stake: