The Delta variant is now responsible for 83 percent of new coronavirus cases in America. This is a drastic increase from earlier this month when the variant accounted for about 50 percent of genetically sequenced coronavirus cases. Testifying at a Senate hearing this week, CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said, “Each death is tragic and even more heartbreaking when we know that the majority of these deaths could be prevented with a simple, safe, available vaccine.”

But as case counts rise, vaccine efforts across the country have stalled and many healthcare workers are still not immunized, particularly in rural areas.  According to the New York Times, one recent estimate indicated that one in four hospital workers were not vaccinated by the end of May, with some facilities reporting that fewer than half of their employees had gotten shots. To keep their workforces healthy, some hospitals, ranging from academic medical centers like New York-Presbyterian and Yale New Haven to large chains like Trinity Health, are now mandating shots.  

Covid’s lingering effects, even in those who had mild disease, are also still impacting elective surgeries. In addition to concerns about respiratory complications from anesthesia, covid may affect multiple organs and systems, and physicians are still learning the implications for surgery. Kaiser Health News reported on a recent study that compared the mortality rate in the 30 days following surgery in patients who had a covid infection and in those who did not. It found that waiting to undergo surgery for at least seven weeks after a covid infection reduced the risk of death to that of people who hadn’t been infected in the first place. Patients with long-haul symptoms should wait even longer, the study suggested.

During the pandemic outpatient facilities rose in popularity and now they’re receiving higher patient satisfaction scores than hospitals. A new survey by The Leapfrog Group of patients at hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers suggests that while patients are satisfied on several levels, safety issues remain a significant concern, especially when children are being treated. CEO, Leah Binder, told Healthcare Dive, “We are worried about signs of patient safety problems, particularly in pediatric units, where parents appear hesitant to raise concerns about mistakes. We also see issues with communication that can lead to patient harm.” 

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