All eyes are on the Supreme Court as we await a decision on the latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act. The key issue this time is whether a 2017 decision by Congress to remove the financial penalty for not buying health insurance — the individual mandate — also eliminated the legal underpinnings that led the court to uphold the law previously. But despite the pending landmark ruling, President Biden and the new Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator, Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, have said they want to expand Obamacare.

In one of her first interviews since confirmation, Brooks-LaSure laid out her plans to broaden the Affordable Care Act saying, “I believe that most people who are not enrolled want coverage but may not understand it’s available or how to get it.” Brooks-LaSure also suggested the administration would support efforts in Congress to ensure coverage for the millions of Americans in the so-called Medicaid gap.

On the private payer side, UnitedHealthcare announced a controversial new policy intended to crack down on emergency department visits and costs. Starting July 1, UnitedHealthcare will evaluate ER claims using several factors to determine if the visit was truly an emergency for its fully insured commercial members across many states. If the insurer finds the visit was a non-emergency, the visit will be “subject to no coverage or limited coverage.” No doubt misuse of the nation’s emergency departments for minor ailments is a costly issue for the healthcare industry. But is this policy in compliance with federal law? How much will it be enforced? And will this discourage patients from seeking care for actual emergencies? Answers to these questions will be the true measure of how well this policy performs.

Finally, Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and an adviser to President Joe Biden, urged more U.S. Covid vaccinations as the harmful ‘Delta’ variant continued to spread in U.K. At a news briefing, Fauci said the Delta variant that was first reported in India now accounts for more than 6 percent of cases being sequenced in the U.S. while in the U.K. it has overtaken the Alpha variant that originated there. Across the U.S., Covid-19 caseloads are falling but so too is the pace of vaccinations. To help keep the momentum up, President Biden has launched a “month of action.”