Are hospitals and health systems ready for a second coronavirus surge? As cases climb, clinicians and government officials are shifting focus towards protecting vulnerable populations. The Boston Globe examined plans for safeguarding the elderly, essential workers, homeless people and inmates. They found high awareness of the challenges, but in some cases, efforts are lacking.

Additionally, a patchwork response and a government focus on nursing homes left many assisted living facilities in the lurch when it came to testing, PPE and other COVID-19 precautions. Elaine Ryan, vice president for state advocacy and strategy integration at AARP, says assisted living has “almost been third tier in terms of focus during this pandemic.” According to AARP Magazine, more than six months later, the federal government has finally recognized assisted living facilities as providers. Much-needed financial help may finally be on the way too.

Safety-net hospitals also face an uncertain fate as federal reimbursement rates change and metropolitan hospitals lose some their best-insured patients to facilities in affluent city neighborhoods. NPR explores how the pandemic only exacerbated these woes at a time when these hospitals’ role – caring for the poor and people of color – has become more important than ever.

Finally, a moratorium from the CDC spotlights a message experts have preached for years without prompting much policy action: Housing stability and health are intertwined. Kaiser Health News reports on social determinants of health and discovers why many families are still being ordered to leave their homes despite an eviction freeze.