Healthcare and technology industries respond to the coronavirus

The global coronavirus outbreak, now a declared public health emergency, is motivating organizations from in and outside healthcare to lend a helping hand. In a recent article, Becker’s writer Andrea Park looks at the ways that tech companies like Facebook and Google are responding to the epidemic.

She writes that Facebook is labeling false claims about the disease as inaccurate, attaching “fact checks” and deprioritizing the posts in users’ feeds, and that Google has reportedly completely shut down its China offices.

Inside healthcare, pharma companies Johnson & Johnson and Inovio Pharmaceuticals are racing to develop a viable coronavirus treatment and tech innovators like Wolters Kluwer are providing easier access to the latest tools and resources for frontline clinicians and medical researchers.

Read the full article in Becker’s Health IT & CIO Report.

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Pressure mounts over proposed data-sharing regulations

More than two dozen companies sent a letter to federal officials calling for proposed data-sharing regulations to be published “without further delay.” Notably, no EHR companies signed. The news comes on the heels of highly publicized objections by EHR giant Epic.

The rules are intended to help improve the exchange of electronic health records and give patients access to their health data, while preventing healthcare organizations from using information blocking tactics.

Industry groups that signed on in support included the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA), Boston Children’s Hospital, Missouri Health Connection, The Pew Charitable Trusts, the American Telemedicine Association (ATA), and The CARIN Alliance.

Get an overview of industry support and objection to the rules in Fierce Healthcare.

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ACP endorses single-payer, public options plans

Modern Healthcare broke the news in January that, for the first time in its history, the American College of Physicians (ACP) endorsed a single-payer health plan as a potential strategy to fix the U.S. healthcare system.

According to the article, the second-largest physician organization in the country envisions a limited role for private insurance companies in a single-payer system – as providers of supplemental coverage.

As healthcare is increasingly politicized, it’ll be interesting to see what influence ACP will have.

See more of what ACP had to say in Modern Healthcare.