Healthcare Information Technology stories you may have missed – 02/06/20

Healthcare Information Technology stories you may have missed – 02/06/20

Healthcare and technology industries respond to the coronavirus

The global coronavirus outbreak, now a declared public health emergency, is motivating organizations from in and outside healthcare to lend a helping hand. In a recent article, Becker’s writer Andrea Park looks at the ways that tech companies like Facebook and Google are responding to the epidemic.

She writes that Facebook is labeling false claims about the disease as inaccurate, attaching “fact checks” and deprioritizing the posts in users’ feeds, and that Google has reportedly completely shut down its China offices.

Inside healthcare, pharma companies Johnson & Johnson and Inovio Pharmaceuticals are racing to develop a viable coronavirus treatment and tech innovators like Wolters Kluwer are providing easier access to the latest tools and resources for frontline clinicians and medical researchers.

Read the full article in Becker’s Health IT & CIO Report.

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Pressure mounts over proposed data-sharing regulations

More than two dozen companies sent a letter to federal officials calling for proposed data-sharing regulations to be published “without further delay.” Notably, no EHR companies signed. The news comes on the heels of highly publicized objections by EHR giant Epic.

The rules are intended to help improve the exchange of electronic health records and give patients access to their health data, while preventing healthcare organizations from using information blocking tactics.

Industry groups that signed on in support included the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA), Boston Children’s Hospital, Missouri Health Connection, The Pew Charitable Trusts, the American Telemedicine Association (ATA), and The CARIN Alliance.

Get an overview of industry support and objection to the rules in Fierce Healthcare.

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ACP endorses single-payer, public options plans

Modern Healthcare broke the news in January that, for the first time in its history, the American College of Physicians (ACP) endorsed a single-payer health plan as a potential strategy to fix the U.S. healthcare system.

According to the article, the second-largest physician organization in the country envisions a limited role for private insurance companies in a single-payer system – as providers of supplemental coverage.

As healthcare is increasingly politicized, it’ll be interesting to see what influence ACP will have.

See more of what ACP had to say in Modern Healthcare.

Week of January 20, 2020

Healthcare/Life Sciences

Technology

Consumer

Professional Services

Life Science stories you may have missed – 01/23/20

Life Science stories you may have missed – 01/23/20

Coronavirus and “shoe-leather epidemiology”

Wired’s Megan Molteni has a way of pulling readers inside her stories with colorful and pointed observations. In her piece on 1/21, notes that despite considerable technology advancement since SARS “figuring out how new diseases spread is still an exercise in shoe-leather epidemiology.” Viral DNA analysis is – and perhaps always will be – only one part of an epidemiological picture.

Read more in Wired

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Precision medicine mustn’t be about drugs alone

On its surface, Vinay Prasad’s piece in Nature is a story of two ships passing in the night. His ship, enlightened public health policy, is often overshadowed by the bright lights of blockbuster drugs, at least in popular media.  The “concepts” of population health and social determinants of health are esoteric by comparison. But these two ships aren’t on different courses. Medicine isn’t about drugs alone, nor should precision medicine, and Vinay is on to something worth closer scrutiny.

Read Vinay’s piece in Nature

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Cardiff University scientists discover T-cell receptor that recognizes and kills multiple cancers

On Monday, researchers from Cardiff University published a study in Nature Immunology about the discovery of a new T-cell receptor (TCR) that “exhibits pan-cancer cell recognition” and could make a patient’s T-cells capable of killing autologous melanoma without affecting healthy cells. The research is still early, but the potential for “pan-cancer, pan-population immunotherapies” to improve health outcomes and health economics is significant.

See study in Nature Immunology

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Week of January 13, 2020

Healthcare/Life Sciences

Professional Services 

 Technology

 

Healthcare Information Technology stories you may have missed – 02/06/20

HIT headlines you may have missed

AI investment by health systems continues to grow

Administrative process improvements across healthcare are desperately needed, and more health systems are investing in artificial intelligence to help facilitate change.

As Healthcare IT News reporter Nathan Eddy points out, many in the healthcare ecosystem are already well on their way. An October Optum survey of 500 U.S. health industry leaders from hospitals, health plans, life sciences and employers, found 22% of respondents are in the late stages of AI strategy implementation.

As AI benefits accrue across the healthcare ecosystem, real savings are possible. According to an Accenture report, key clinical health AI applications could potentially create $150 billion in annual savings for the U.S. healthcare economy by 2026.

Read more in Healthcare IT News

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Healthcare makes good on addressing social needs

In 2019, the phrase “social determinants” dominated headlines. Fortunately, this wasn’t a case of all talk, no action.

Steve Ross Johnson of Modern Healthcare recently wrote, “From affordable housing initiatives to funding economic revitalization of impoverished communities, the year saw industry leaders make some of their biggest investments yet toward addressing socioeconomic factors tied to improving patient outcomes.”

Some suspect that swift progress in addressing the social needs of patients through targeted interventions may be a response to a reimbursement landscape that’s encouraging providers to take on more risk.

Learn more about strides made in 2010 in Modern Healthcare

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Tech Giants Shake Industry with Big Moves in 2019 

The nation’s biggest technology companies, including Alphabet, Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft, all made significant healthcare plays in 2019, and this shows these nontraditional competitors are here to stay.

Apple’s consumer- and enterprise-facing health projects are especially notable. Business Insider recently reported that Apple has even more planned for 2020, a sign of its deliberate and aggressive strategy. In fact, some industry projections have Apple’s healthcare division generating $313 billion in revenue by 2027.

Get a glimpse into what Apple has planned in the new year at Business Insider

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