Recent healthcare provider news you may have missed

Recent healthcare provider news you may have missed

From Christine Williamson, Vice President at Greenough Brand Storytellers

Sweeping Changes to Massachusetts Healthcare Laws

Governor Baker’s healthcare proposal is ambitious and all-encompassing. The Boston Globe writes: “It takes the unusual step of requiring hospitals and insurers to increase their spending on primary care and behavioral health care by 30 percent over three years. In order to do this and meet existing requirements to control health spending, they will need to scale back in other areas — such as expensive hospital services.”

For more information, check out The Boston Globe

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States Prepare Health Insurance Contingency Plans

A federal appeals court decision that could strike down the Affordable Care Act could come as soon as this month! See how lawmakers in states including Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico and California are pursuing legislation to preserve some healthcare coverage if the ACA is overturned.

Read story in The Wall Street Journal to learn more about what’s at stake

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Is a Harsh Flu Season a Boom or a Bust for Providers?

A severe flu season can impact providers’ bottom lines in many ways. According to Healthcare Dive, large, publicly traded health systems can see a slight boost to margins despite the additional staffing needed to combat flu, but smaller and nonprofit organizations are more strained and have less ability to capitalize on increased visits. Read on to see the impact to community hospitals, telehealth companies, urgent care and skilled nursing facilities.

Get the full story at Healthcare Dive

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Health Insurers Tackle Social Determinants of Health

Jeffrey Brenner, a physician turned health insurance executive, aims to reduce healthcare expenses not by denying care, but by spending more on social interventions, starting with housing. But how to do it is still largely uncharted.

Dive deeper with Bloomberg

Recent healthcare provider news you may have missed

Recent healthcare provider news you may have missed

From Christine Williamson, Vice President at Greenough Brand Storytellers

A New Way of Paying for Maternity Care

Doctors and insurers see bundled payments, or episodes of care, as a possible way to improve health outcomes and lower costs of maternity care, including driving down the number of unnecessary c-sections nationwide. But, as reporter Carmen Heredia Rodriguez points out, payment models like this are relatively new and their structure can differ by insurer. For models like this to succeed, supporters will need to show consistency, capture quality patient data and increase payer/provider collaboration.

For more information, check out NPR.org

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Hospitals Enter the Housing Business

Homelessness is one of the biggest social determinants of health, and now hospitals from Baltimore to St. Louis to Sacramento are taking action. According to Kaiser Health News, “With recent federal policy changes that encourage hospitals to allocate charity dollars for housing, many hospitals realize it’s cheaper to provide a month of housing than to keep patients for a single night.”

In addition to exploring innovative new programs like providing housing, more work must be done. This includes putting screening systems in place so that clinicians can ask important questions about food insecurity, housing instability, utility needs, transportation and interpersonal violence.

Dive deeper with Kaiser Health News

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Cartoons Help this Pediatrician Reach Young Patients

As seen in the Boston Globe: “Dr. John Maypole, a pediatrician at Boston Medical Center, creates whimsical drawings while caring for some of the most vulnerable children. He gets down on the floor and crawls under tables, if that’s what it takes — with pen and paper in hand — to distract and soothe scared youngsters.”

An amazing article from reporter Kay Lazar that shows the human side of healthcare and people who are making a difference! Exactly the type of story we like to tell at Greenough.

Get the full story at The Boston Globe

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Mass. Hospitals Face Strict Surgery Regulations

New regulations, which medical experts describe as among the most far-reaching in the country, require that doctors provide more information to patients who are considering surgery and document each time a lead surgeon enters and leaves the operating room. The regulations also take a hard line on doctors who come to work impaired by alcohol or drugs and who delegate duties to unlicensed practitioners.

Read story in The Boston Globe to learn more about what’s at stake: 

Maximizing your Company Announcement: A 3-Step Process to Keep the Media Momentum Going

A strong news pipeline is a critical component of any public relations campaign. Major company announcements like executive changes or new products, services or customers can be great inflection points for generating earned media coverage – but the interviews and articles shouldn’t stop once the press release crosses the wire. Rather, businesses should view these announcements as launching pads for sustained thought-leadership campaigns that keep the media momentum going.

Our media relations teams utilize a 3-step process to secure continuous media coverage that lasts past the initial news announcement date.

Rise of the Mobile News Junkie: 4 Insights From the State of the News Media Annual Report

paper and glasses

paper and glasses

Shifts in consumers’ news behavior have a tremendous impact on how we, as PR professionals, get our clients’ messages across. In the Pew Research Center’s annual State of the News Media report, thirty-nine of the top fifty news websites now see more traffic coming from mobile devices than from desktop computers – representing one of the biggest changes in America’s news habits.
As readership on digital-only and social mediums grows, media relations strategies must adapt. Any good agency will understand and appreciate the value of an old-school hit like a Wall Street Journal article and an interview on an iHeartRadio station, but the strategy shouldn’t stop there. With so many new faces in the game, it’s more important than ever to do your research. PR firms and the companies they represent should weigh the social reach and social influence of the reporter and the outlet before jumping on or declining a potential media opportunity. As the number of people who view news on their mobile devices continues to increase, getting tweeted about could make all the difference in reaching your next customer.

Below are 4 additional key findings from this year’s State of the News Media report.

  1. Audio journalism, across the board, sees new life

It was a break-out year for podcasts – fueled by smartphone growth and drivers listening in their cars, NPR’s podcasts and downloads alone grew 41%. Internet radio listening is also up. More than half of Americans 12 and older have listened to an online radio station in the past month and most of the listening is being done via mobile device.

So what does this mean for AM/FM radio, which traditionally had a stronghold on people stuck in traffic? Not much actually. While one might think that the rise of podcasts would decrease the public’s affinity for broadcast radio, it hasn’t. Broadcast radio still reaches the overwhelming majority of the American public. In fact, 91% of people report listening to the radio in the week before they were surveyed.

  1. Both network and local TV capture more viewers

Legacy brands haven’t been abandoned – it’s just the way in which consumers are connecting to network and local news has changed. Local TV News continues to gain audience share in the evening (3%), but the biggest audience growth posted in the very early morning, as the 4:30 a.m. newscasts got a 6% boost from the year before. Network news viewership rose for the second year in a row, but the biggest benefit to placing a story with one of the big three (ABC, CBC or NBC) may be their online presence. According to the analytics firm comScore, the three commercial broadcast networks rank among the top domestic news and information destinations, but ABC’s partnership with Yahoo gives them a slight edge. All three now receive more visits from a mobile device than a desktop computer.

  1. People still read newspapers in print

We’ve seen a significant shift to all digital formats for many trade magazines, but so far top tier newspapers are resisting, and with good reason. 56% of those who consume a newspaper read it exclusively in print, while 11% also read it on a laptop; 5% also read it on mobile and another 11% read it on all three mediums. In total, more than eight in every ten newspaper readers read the print version at least part of the time. As with network news sites, mobile traffic is on the rise. Most online newspaper visitors are arriving through Twitter or Facebook links and they don’t stay long on the main news site – making the outlet’s or the reporter’s social promotion of a story featuring your company a lot more important.

  1. Digital-only outlets become influential players

Known-mostly for its humorous lists, Buzzfeed is extremely popular with millennials – so popular that NBCUniversal Inc. recently announced that it’s investing $200 million in the digital site. But Buzzfeed is more than just funny clickbait. It’s the second most visited digital-only news site behind the Huffington Post, and it’s making big journalistic hires – poaching reporters and editors from the New York Times, The Guardian and the San Francisco Chronicle. Other digital news outlets like Vice, Quartz, Politico and Vox are increasingly influential as well – all boasting millions of unique visitors per month.

So what do you think? Do these findings reflect how you’re getting your news? Do you spend more time reading the headlines on Twitter than flipping through the pages of the Times? And how have these changing habits impacted your company’s media strategy? For us here at Greenough, we’re constantly monitoring all these channels and looking for ways to disrupt the conversation.

Christine Williamson is Manager, Media Relations at Greenough. Follow her on Twitter: @ChristineDBW